Conservation status revision and communities’ perceptions of 22 Aloe species in Tanzania
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Supplementary Files

Supplementary file 1

Keywords

area of occupancy
community surveys
distribution
Eastern Africa
extent of occurrence
interviews
IUCN category
threatened

How to Cite

Abihudi, S., de Boer, H. and Treydte, A. (2021) “Conservation status revision and communities’ perceptions of 22 Aloe species in Tanzania”, Plant Ecology and Evolution, 154(3), pp. 391-404. doi: 10.5091/plecevo.2021.1838.

Abstract

Background and aims – Many Aloe species are globally threatened due to overharvesting for trade and habitat destruction. CITES regulates their international trade. In Tanzania, 50% of all existing Aloe species had previously been assessed, though some of these assessments were Data Deficient. For those with sufficient data, an update is required as the rate of decline has rapidly increased over the last years.
Material and methods – We estimated Area of Occupancy (AOO), Extent of Occurrence (EOO), and number of locations for 22 Tanzanian Aloe species using the Geospatial Conservation Assessment software (GeoCAT). We assessed the reasons leading to their decline based on direct field observations and community perceptions.
Key results – We revised the conservation status of 22 Aloe species; two were assessed as Critically Endangered, ten as Endangered, five as Vulnerable, and five as Least Concern. We re-discovered the Critically Endangered Aloe boscawenii, which had not been seen in Tanzania for more than six decades. We propose to downgrade the endemic Aloe dorotheae, Aloe leptosiphon, and Aloe flexilifolia from Critically Endangered to a lower threat level. The community perception on Aloe species availability did not accurately reflect their categorisation based on the IUCN criteria B. We identified agricultural activities and climate change effects as the two main threats to Tanzanian Aloe species.
Conclusion – We conclude that overall numbers are declining for 22 Aloe species in Tanzania, mainly due to human activities. We recommend the implementation of laws and policies to protect their natural habitats.

https://doi.org/10.5091/plecevo.2021.1838
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